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Air Line Material Suggestions

Black Iron Pipe

  • Pros: Very solid?
  • Cons: Not easily moved, expensive($1 per foot?), requires more tools than flexible solutions (hand threader and pipe cutter) and possibly a professional to install.


  • Pros: Can be moved to a different building, definitely adequate (200 psi max at room temperature). Fewer fittings required compared to non-flexible materials.
  • Cons: Expensive ($369 for 300ft of 3/4" at northern tool)

PVC (Schedule 80)

  • Pros:
  • Cons: A lot of forum posts from people who say they've had it in their shop for 10 years and it works fine, but also lots of posts saying it's not recommended. Oil and heat can make it brittle. Shrapnel produced if it explodes. "It's not rated for compressed air. Yes, some people have used it successfully, but it's not the right product for the job."


  • Pros: Same as RapidAir? Cheaper than rapidair ($200 for 300ft of 3/4" on ebay). Max 200 psi at room temperature. Fewer fittings required compared to non-flexible materials. Designed to not produce shrapnel when it bursts.
  • Cons: Need to find fittings and outlets elsewhere. Requires crimping tool for fittings ($50?). Manufacturer doesn't recommend using it with air, it's made for water lines.

Link to Pex-Al-Pex on ebay


  • Pros: Low friction, no rust, and handles high pressure.
  • Cons: Requires skill, torch, tubing cutter, and crocus cloth to assemble. Most expensive option? Will not move to the next space easily.

Nylon Vacuum Tubing

  • Pros: 60 cents per foot , ~300 psi max at room temperature, easy to find fittings, flexible
  • Cons: Easy to damage? May get kinked easily?

Air Drops

Suggested by Robert:

  • Electronics Room - ?
  • Dark Room - ?
  • Craft Room - Air Brush
  • Laser - Replace smaller compressor
  • Bio Room - ?
  • 3 In Warehouse - ?

Design Suggestions

  • Make the line go UP when coming from the compressor, it will make the water drip into the tank.